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Jul 4, 2011 10:30am EDT
are engaged in today. these are officer cadets at eton, britain's most exclusive private school, drilling in 1915. now, one of the things that we have gotten accustomed to in this country in recent years -- vietnam, iraq, afghanistan -- is that they are fought mostly by the poor. there are very, very few among the dead and wounded in the those three wars who have been sons or daughters of ceos, senators, members of congress, anything like that. it was the exact opposite in the first world war. the death toll actually fell proportionately higher on the upper classes. and the main reason for that was that it was customary for sons of the upper classes, sons of the air strock rah si to have military careers. and i think a major reason for this is that armies are not only there to fight wars against other countries, they're there to maintain order at home. the 19th century was a very tumultuous time in europe, so was the early 20th century. many of the european armies were used to break strikes or the british army, you know, put down tenant farmer rebellions in ireland. and so, therefore, off
CSPAN
Jul 4, 2011 7:00am EDT
was always right. and an essential key, as with the idea that because britain and germany were both anglo-saxon races, that they would not go to work with one another. it's an absurdity needless to say until may levels, but basically because he himself had served in the trenches in the great war when they had fought one another. nonetheless, by the time to second world war broke out their only 46 operational u-boats against the united kingdom because he didn't believe he would ever ask have to fight the united kingdom by the end of the war through 463, most of them bottled up in the baltic. but if you start the second world war with as many u-boats as the fish would've been able to have strangled the united kingdom. and when one looks at the plans to invade the united kingdom, many of which were not even a great into september 1940, when really they should have been put in place since he came to power in january 1933. one appreciates how little he was expecting to have to attack. there is the infamous -- the list of 2820 britons who are going to be shot on sight, or at least when they wer
CSPAN
Jul 3, 2011 8:00pm EDT
. in a conversation what britain's prime minister, david cameron. this "q&a" week aren't a new book by scott miller. it tells the story of life in america. president william mckinley was shot by an assassin leon czolgosz. >> why did he decide to do a book on the assassination of william mckinley? >> i have been interested in this timeframe in the 18 eighties and the 1890's. it is a fascinating and important turning point. before then, you had a united states that would be recognized by the founding fathers. by the turn of the century, it is the america we would know it today. it is a tremendous patriotism in this time. it is very romantic. you look through american society and to see it. we think of the tycoons. it was a proliferation of new products. you'd be hard-pressed to go to a grocery store where you did not see projects came from this. ivory soap, pillsbury dough. the art really reflected this as well. john philip sousa was writing this. who was leon czolgosz? did he use a different name? >> he was the assassin. he had worked in a steel factory. he worked in the cleveland area. did the econ
CSPAN
Jul 4, 2011 2:00pm EDT
of collapse, and it will not collapse. it is very much like britain and rome. if you look at the realms beaches in the senate, just before the empire, use the absolute predictions of catastrophe. that happened to. >> host: okay, so 10 years so now we'll come back and have this conversation. we will see how it worked out. >> guest: it will be the same conversation. >> host: thank you so much. it's been a great conversation today. >> guest: i enjoyed it. >> that was "after words," booktv signature program in which authors of latest nonfiction books are in the by journalists, public policymakers, legislators and others familiar with the material. "after words" airs every weekend on booktv at 10 p.m. on saturday, 12 and 9 p.m. on sunday and 12 a.m. on monday. you can also watch "after words" online. go to booktv.org and click on "after words" in the booktv series on the upper right side of the page. >> up next on booktv, investigative reporter annie jacobsen presents the history of the military base, area 51, which is located in the nevada desert. the author use of recently declassified doc
Search Results 0 to 3 of about 4